Mumbai Rains: Compensation of 2 lakh will be given to the families of those who lost their lives, PM Modi announced

Mumbai: Heavy rain continues in Mumbai since late night. Due to which 17 people died when walls collapsed on some shanties in the waterlogged areas of Chembur and Vikhroli. Apart from this, many other people are likely to be trapped there. Meanwhile, the Prime Minister of the country, Narendra Modi, has announced a compensation of Rs 2 lakh to the people killed by the wall collapse and 50 thousand to the injured in a tweet.

At present, the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO) has announced that the next of kin of each deceased will be given two lakh rupees from the Prime Minister’s National Relief Fund (PMNRF). And the injured will be given a compensation of 50 thousand. Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been quoted as saying that ‘I am deeply saddened by the loss of lives due to wall collapse in Chembur and Vikhroli, Mumbai. My thoughts are with the bereaved families in this hour of grief. Praying for the speedy recovery of those who have been injured.

Defense Minister Rajnath Singh also expressed grief over loss of lives due to wall collapse in Chembur and expressed condolences to the affected families.

The Indian Meteorological Department had issued a red alert of heavy rain in Mumbai. In view of this, due to the heavy rains here, the low-lying areas have been flooded. At present, a team of National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) is reaching the Bharat Nagar area of ​​Chembur and the rescue operation is going on.

At present, due to heavy rains in Mumbai, a serious problem of waterlogging has arisen in the city and local train services have been suspended. Railway officials said that the suburban train services of the Central Railway and Western Railway have been suspended in the financial capital due to waterlogging in the tracks due to heavy rains overnight. This rain reminded of 944 mm of rain during the 24 hours of rain on 26 July 2005.

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